KK's Family History

Researching the Kult & Lawhorn and Case & Collier Families

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97 According to Mary Ruth Case's Case/Collier Family genealogy, the last name is spelled "Terrin". According to Barbara Helwick's Family records, Mary's last name is spelled "Terril".  TERRIL, Mary (I4094)
 
98 According to source #190, James Emory Bell was the son of A.C and Hester Bell. BELL, James Emory (I2985)
 
99 According to the Adams Cemetery website, Laura Adams could be
"Victoria Adams, b.15 Sep 1860, d. 20 Oct. 1889, wife of B. Adams"
(wife of Buford Hamilton)?
However, the Phelps Burial website (source #190) records her name as Laura. 
DEAN, Laura (I3491)
 
100 Adopted by Sam & Lila in 1905 OLIVER, Mary (I5262)
 
101 Adopted son of James Monroe and Cynthia Ann Broyles. REDWINE, Leander A. (I1006)
 
102 After Frank's death, Martha moved her family several times before settling south of Qulin on the Hazelton Ranch in the Davis Community, just north of the Davis School, later to become known as the Upper Davis School. MATHIS, Martha Ann (I3926)
 
103 After Oliver died, Mary married William, Oliver's older brother. Family F100
 
104 After the civil war, Warren became a teamster, moving freight from Tuscumbia to Yancy Mills and later onto the mill at Lecoma, where he bought land and raised his family. CASE, Joseph Warren I (I3927)
 
105 Agnes Collier - (Clarence W. Love Obituaries 1905-1915 pg. 80)
Mrs. Agnes Collier died at the residence of her son Jesse Collier, in
Rolla, Wednesday, January 6, 1915 of the infimities incident to old age.
She was born Jan. 21, 1850 being 65years, 11 months, and 15 days old at the time of her death. Her maiden name was Agnes E.[sic] Wright.
On September 13, 1874 she was united in marriage to Amos Collier. To
this union three children were born. Two with her husband have already
passed away leaving one son Jesse, her sole survivor. The funeral was
held at Edgar Springs Friday, Rev. L. D. Moneymaker officiating.
Deceased was and exemplary Christian lady, uniting with the Christian
Church 31 years ago under teachings of Eld. R. W. Turner. She remained true to that faith..... (Times-Jan. 14, 1915) 
WRIGHT, Agnes Ann (I1237)
 
106 Aka as Jayhoda or Jehoida - Moved to Macon Co, Missouri by 1840 MARSH, Joseph D. Jehoida (I3776)
 
107 Alex Case, 59, Dies

Alex Case, 59 years old, died at his home four miles west of Lecoma, Saturday, March 4, 1933. He was buried Sunday at the Anutt Cemetery. There was an unusually large crowd present to pay their last tribute of respect to their departed friend and neighbor.

Mr. Case was born and reared in Dent County. He lived many years in the neighborhood in which he died. He is survived by his wife and six children and one adopted son. Also three brothers and one sister survives. He was a member of the Church of God. He was a good, honest citizen always true to his neighbors and his friends. His death is mourned by many. 
CASE, Alexander Leander (I2798)
 
108 Alexander moved the family to St. Louis, Missouri in 1907, living near Tower Grove. The children attended Adams school. Alexander worked for Evans Howard Fire Clay Company that made all kinds of clay products. He drove a team of horses and wagon making deliveries. The company kept about 50 horses at a time using one pair to a wagon. Alexander moved his family back to the farm in Lecoma in 1914 where he worked as a farmer until he died in 1933. His wife Minnie, moved to Rolla Missouri and lived until her death in July 1962. CASE, Alexander Leander (I2798)
 
109 Alice was Vandy's twin KULT, Alice (I3939)
 
110 Allen and Alexander, brothers
married Lena (Linnie) and Minnie Melton, sisters 
Family F97
 
111 Allen and Alexander, brothers, married Lena (Linnie) and Minnie Melton, sisters. Family F1131
 
112 Also in Belleville News Democrat, 4 June 2002, section 2B, page 6 KULT, Ann (I3940)
 
113 Also in Rolla Herald Rolla Herald, Rolla, Missouri, Thu, Jan 7, 1915, Page 4:
OBIT-COLLIER-Agnes 
WRIGHT, Agnes Ann (I1237)
 
114 Also on http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/belleville/obituary.aspx?n=florentine-keen&pid=187214727 Source (S1250)
 
115 Also on Newspapers.com ($ subscription) https://www.newspapers.com/clip/4446257/obitcollieramos/
 
Source (S54)
 
116 Also spelled "Runka" or "Ronga" RONKA, Marianna (I1403)
 
117 Alternate names found:
Kezia source: World Family Tree, vol 65 tree 1530
Kizar source: Hand-written family records
Kezihiah source: Death Certificate of daughter, Mary Frances (Collier) Case
Kazir source: Compiled Genealogy from Mary Ruth Case
Correct spelling seems to be "Keziah"

Bessie Marsh Collier, ill with tuberculosis, took Mary Frances Collier with her to her mother's (Rhoda Marsh) birthday dinner, 25 Nov 1909, and remained at her parent's home until her death on 31 Jan 1910. 
MARSH, Keziah Elizabeth (I4249)
 
118 Alternate place of marriage according to Bubsheim Marriage records. They may have recorded the marriage in both the Husband's (Bubsheim) and Wife's (Egesheim) parishes. Family F2147
 
119 Alternate spelling of last name: Glaspie? GELASPIE, John (I497)
 
120 Amos Collier listed as teacher on 1860 Laclede census with mother and father. May have helped brother David T. Collier in mercantile business in Licking, Missouri. He moved to and helped build Edgar Springs, Missouri. He had a hotel, married Agnes Wright, either had a funeral parlor or at least sold Grandma Eliza Case funeral clothes, etc. for Grandpa Joe Warren Case's funeral. Invoice shows Amos' signature as "Amos C. Collier". COLLIER, Amos C. (I1226)
 
121 Amos Collier, a merchant of Edgar Springs, died on last Saturday after a short illness of dropsy. He was buried on Sunday with full Masonic honors. Mr. Collier was a man well liked by all who knew him, and his sudden death will be regretted by all.

[transcribed from the Rolla Herald by Kathy Kult] 
COLLIER, Amos C. (I1226)
 
122 Amos was captured, then escaped. His confession is transcribed below:

Statement of Amos Collier, a prisoner at the Gratiot Str Prison, St. Louis, made the 20th day of April 1863.
My age is 23 years
I live in Laclede County, Missouri
I was born in Gasconade County, Missouri
I was captured in St. Clair County on or about the 23rd day of March 1863

The cause of my capture was I was a soldier in the confederate army

I was in arms against the United States and was a Private in Captain Walton’s Company, Colonel Elliot’s Battalion. I was sworn into the Rebel service about the 25th day of September 1862 by Mosely in Cove Creek Ark for 3 years or during the war
I was in the MO State Guard Under McBride in the six months service –
served my time out

When captured I was first taken to Rolla and remained there 14 days and was not examined there and was sent to Gratiot St Prison about the 16th day of April 1863

I took the oath of allegiance to the United States about the 10th day of May 1862

Subscribed by the Prisoner, this day
A. Collier
first named, in my presence
WG Strong
Capt & Aag
?
The prisoner makes additional statements as follows, in answer to questions:

1. How many times have you been in arms during the rebellion?

Twice

2. What commanders have you served under?

Gen McBride & Col Elliot

3. What battles or skirmishes have you been in?

Prairie Grove

4. Did you have arms, or were you on picket, or what part did you take in the action?

Yes, in the reserve

5. Have you ever furnished arms or ammunition, horses, provisions, or any kind of supplies to any rebels? State when, where and how ofter

My own horse

6. Was there any rebel camp near you, that you did not give notice of to the U. S. troops?

No Sir

7. Have you ever been with any one taking or pressing horses, arms or other property?

Yes - Six horses – we were ordered to do so by our Captain

8. Are you enrolled in E.M.M. – loyal or disloyal?

I offered to enroll, but Maj Perry would not accept me

9. Are you a southern sympathizer

I am

10. Do you sincerely desire to have the southern people put down in this war, and the authority of the U.S. Government over them restored?

I do not
?
11. How many slaves have you? None

12. Have you a wife – how many children?

No Sir

13. What is your occupation? Farmer & School Teacher

14. What relatives have you in the rebellion?

None that I know of

15. Have you ever been in any Rebel camp? If so, whose – when – where – and how long? What did you do? Did you leave it, or were you captured in it?

None but my own, Elliot’s. Different places. About seven months. Stood guard &c. I was captured while on a scouting party. I made no resistance. In September 1862 I went away to Arkansas joined the rebel army there. I went away because I was required to work upon the Fort at Lebanon, MO by the federals. I desire to be exchanged.
A. Collier
?
Statement of Amos Collier, a prisoner captured by Captain Allen of the 47th Reg ???

I was in the MO State Guard under McBride in the six month service, when I was discharged I came in and took the Oath of Allegiance to the United States at Lebanon, MO before Captain Wirpel?? about 10 May 1862 \. I stayed in ??? until September when I went away to Arkansas and joined the Rebel Army at Cove Creek, Ark. I went away because I was required to work upon the Fort at Lebanon, MO. I remained in the army until the 14th of March 1863 when I got away. I left with other men. I came up by West Plains & Mountain Store. I swapped horses with a man I met on the Gasconade by the name of Marr?? We all intended to make our way north and endeavor to get in with a gov’t train and across the plains, where we were chased by Captain Allen and his men, and finally captured in a house.

The above statement was made by the above named “Amos Collier” before me this 12th day of April 1863

D. ???
Ist Lt ???
8th Regiment Cavalry MSM 
COLLIER, Amos C. (I1226)
 
123 Amos went to Philippines/Japan and served with 11th Airborne Division. Has medals for good conduct for going overseas. LAWHORN, Amos Joseph (I3738)
 
124 An alternate birth is 25 Sep 1791 in Hamilton County Ohio MCCORMICK, John Wesley Jr. (I4621)
 
125 An alternate birthdate has been recorded as"Sep 1894" by World Family Tree, Vol. 58, Tree 14. ADAMS, General Lee (I506)
 
126 An alternate birthplace for her has been recorded as Bingham in Fayette, Illinois. CASE, MSgt. Mary Ruth (I2865)
 
127 An alternate marriage date is 9 Aug 1811 Family F1685
 
128 An unknown son was recorded by a mark on the census for a male between the ages of 5 and 10. The members in the household were:

2 - males 5-10 (Cornelius, age 7; and an unknown King son)
1 - male 20-30 (either Jacob, age 29; John Wesley, age 25; or William Henry, age 22)
1 - male 50-60 (John, age 50)
1 - female 10-15 (most likely Jane McCormick, age 14)
1 - female 20-29 (most likely Catherine McCormick)
1 - female 40-50 (Bethia, age 45) 
KING, [Unknown] (I5791)
 
129 and 2 Babies are also buried near Maraba Hood MELTON, Maraba (I39)
 
130 Andrew Jackson (Dick) Kitchen
Missouri was the scene of more Civil War battles than any other state except Virginia and Tennessee. The Union army took [food] from the poor to feed their army. They took what they wanted, or killed the people if they resisted giving up their food and supplies. Some of the people fought the north as Bushwhackers instead of putting on a southern uniform. They destroyed government supply wagons at Beaver Creek, south of Rolla, and around Edgar Springs.
After the war, President Lincoln said to pardon everyone and start again. However, Governor Crittendon of Missouri refused to pardon the Bushwhackers, who had done the Union Army the most damage. In this area, he put out wanted posters on Dick Kitchen, Anthony Wright, Bill Wilson, and Jim Jamison. Bill Wilson fled to Texas, Anthony Wright went to Louisiana, Jim Jamison was later pardoned and became a Texas Ranger.
Dick Kitchen was hiding after the War in a cave east of where Highway H crosses the Little Piney (east of Edgar Springs) at Black Oak. Dick's mother's home was at the foot of the hill as you start up to Mitchell Cemetery. Oral family history tells that Sergeant Jim Samples, head of the Home Guard, came with his troops to Dick's mother's home, looking for him. Bett, who is Dick's half-sister, was 16 years old at the time. At night, she would slip out and take him food. Samples and the men caught her and tried to force her to tell where Dick was hiding. She wouldn't tell, so they hung her from a limb of a walnut tree, which was next to the house. They had shoved her mother, Elizabeth, into the house and chained the door so she couldn't get out. Then they piled straw up to the front door and set it on fire. They let Bett down, and then hung her again. The second time she was turning blue just as Dick got there, and he shot the rope from the limb. The men took off when Dick ran up to try to rescue Elizabeth from the fire. Bett had a rope burn on her neck for many years. Dick was so anguished that he could have killed all of Sample's men, but in reality, he really didn't want to kill anyone.
Another time Samples and the Home Guard came to Coon's (Dick's brother) home and took him up on the ridge. They told him if he didn't tell them where Dick was, they were going to kill him. He thought the only thing that saved him was John Samples (Jim's father) came out in the road with them.
Once, after the war, Coon and Eliza came home and found that Carter, Reed, Samples, and more of them, had taken the boards off their smokehouse and were carrying off all his meat and loading up the corn out of the barn. There was nothing he could do - it wasn't worth getting killed for. He could have only stopped one before they killed him or his family.
John Samples and some more killed a 12 year old boy at Pilot Knob. The boy was tending the cattle on a horse and John Samples said it took two shots to make him fall out of the saddle.
The log barn across the road from Don and Connie Davidson's present home used to be located in the field across the road from Bud and Juanita Arthur's present home. In later years, it was moved up the road and made into a barn. Dick Kitchen had gone to this house to visit his girlfriend and sit up with "old lady Mace", probably Martha Ellen's mother. She was very sick. Jim Samples found out where Dick was and brought the Home Guard about dark. They told him to come out. They fired into the house and two bullets went into "old lady Mace's" pillow. Dick told them to blow out the light and get on the floor. He saw the glint of the gun barrel in the moonlight and fired and went out with both guns firing. He killed Samples and wounded some of the men. He was a crackshot. Dick got his horse and got away. The other soldiers got scared and left.
Then the men went up the road to (where Henry and Mary Blake live today) to Uncle Antnie Kitchen's home (Dick's brother) and got him up about 2:00 in the morning to haul the Samples body home. Uncle Antnie brought his team of oxen and wagon. Antnie said he could hear the man's teeth a popping as he went up that bumpy road, so he tied a cloth around his head. Samples lived where Dick and Pat Rogers live today. Antnie got there about daylight. Mr. Samples came out and thanked him for bringing his boy's body home. Someone asked Antnie if he didn't hate to haul him. Uncle Antnie said, "only thing I hated was I didn't have a full load." The Home Guard broke up after Samples was killed.
Dick was freighting and was at a Blacksmith shop in Evening Shade, Arkansas. He had to shoe his horse. He took off his guns and hung them up on the bellows. He didn't have enough horseshoe nails and while he was getting them. someone shot him in the back with his own gun. He is buried in Evening Shade, Arkansas.
These men were not outlaws, they tried to stay neutral but were forced into either being Confederate soldiers or Bushwhackers. They believed they could help the most as they did and tried to protect their families and themselves. They were the result of a war they didn't want. The old timers tell that except in very rare circumstances, if you were a Democrat, you were for the South and if you were a Republican, you were for the North. Southern Sympathizers in Missouri lost their right to vote for five years following the war. They also had to register as Southern Sympathizers during the War.
These Kitchen stories were told by Faye Davidson, great-niece of Dick Kitchen and also great-niece of his wife, Martha Ellen Mace. Also by Richard (Dick) Kitchen of Lenox, Missouri, age 79 years, great-nephew of Dick Kitchen. Also by many other family members and friends. Mildred Hall and Helen Dooley are also great-nieces of Dick Kitchen.
"I have submitted these stories because I want our children and grandchildren to realize the Civil War happened and that it happened right here in Edgar Springs. My five year old grandson, Chad, asked me "Which was the good side, Grandma?" This war didn't have a good side, just fighting for the cause you believed in or trying to survive". -- Connie Davidson, 1986.
Source: Arthur, Colleen, Edgar Springs: Its history and its people, 1986, pp. 174-176. 
KITCHENS, Andrew Jackson "Dick" (I680)
 
131 Andrew Jackson (Dick) Kitchen was the son of George Kitchen and Elizabeth Adams. Dick (Bushwhacker book) married Martha Ellen Mace Edgar, March 31,1867, the daughter of Henry Mace and Elizabeth Black. Dick and Martha had a little girl who died after eating too many dried apples. She is buried at the Renaud Cemetery.

Oral family history says Dick and others fought the North as bushwhackers instead of putting on Southern uniforms. They destroyed government supply wagons at Beaver Creek, south of Rolla and around Edgar Springs and also gave food back to those people from whom the army had taken it.

At the conclusion of the war all Southern sympathizers were to be pardoned, but the one in charge of Missouri said, "No". This area put out posters for Dick Kitchens, Anthony Wright, Bill Wilson and Jim Jamison.BILL went to Texas, Anthony to Louisiana, Jim was later pardoned and became a Texas Ranger.

After the war Dick was hiding in a cave east of Edgar Springs (where Highway H crosses Little Piney). Dick's mother's home was at the foot of the hill that leads to the Mitchell Cemetery. Sergeant Jim Samples and the Home Guard came looking for Dick. Dick's half-sister Bett, age 16, would slip out at night and take him food. Samples and his men caught her and tried to make her reveal where Dick was. She wouldn't, so they hung her from a walnut tree by the house. They shoved her mother into the house, chained the door, piled straw up to the front door and set it on fire. When they let Bett down, she said, "Now I didn't tell you, and I never will!" Then they hung her again. The second time, she was turning blue. By then Dick had gotten there with his guns shooting. The soldiers ran off. Bett had rope burns on her neck for many years. Dick said he could have killed them all, but he didn't want to kill anyone.

Another time Samples and his men came to Coon's (Dick's brother) home and took him up on a ridge to kill him if he didn't tell where Dick was. Coon thought the only thing that saved him was that John Samples, Jim's father, came. He was a Baptist preacher. He preached in a coat that had a bullet hole in the back. He walked stooped over. They asked him how he got that way. He said, "From dodging Bill Wilson's bullets." He had a crease on the back of his head from one.

Martha Ellen's mother was very sick. (She lived where Bud Arthur's farmis now located.) Dick went there to help sit up with her. Samples found out where he was and brought the Home Guard after dark. They fired two bullets into Mrs. Mace's pillow. Dick told his relatives to blow out the light and get on the floor. Dick saw the glint of a gun barrel and went out with both guns firing. He killed Samples and wounded some other. Dick escaped on his horse.

The soldiers went up to Uncle Antnie's (Dick's brother) at 2:00 in the morning to make him haul Samples's body home. He hauled the body with ateam of oxen and wagon. John Samples thanked him for bringing his boy home. Somebody asked Antnie if he didn't hate to haul him. He said, "Only thing I hate -- I didn't have a full load."

Dick was freighting and was at a blacksmith shop in Evening Shade, Arkansas. He had to shoe his horse. He took off his guns and hung them upon the bellows. He didn't have enough horseshoe nails and while getting them, someone shot him in the back with his own gun. He is buried at Evening Shade.

Martha's farm was where Roy Davidson's farm is located today. Martha later married Tom Kepler. She is buried in Renaud Cemetery.

Dicks's uncle, "Piney Bill" William Adams was kept awhile as a prisoner during the Civil War because authorities accused him of harboring bushwhackers in his home.

Submitted by Connie Davidson 
ADAMS, Elizabeth (I592)
 
132 Andrew Jackson (Dick) Kitchen was the son of George Kitchen and Elizabeth Adams. Dick (Bushwhacker book) married Martha Ellen Mace Edgar, March 31,1867, the daughter of Henry Mace and Elizabeth Black. Dick and Martha had a little girl who died after eating too many dried apples. She is buried at the Renaud Cemetery.

Oral family history says Dick and others fought the North as bushwhackers instead of putting on Southern uniforms. They destroyed government supply wagons at Beaver Creek, south of Rolla and around Edgar Springs and also gave food back to those people from whom the army had taken it.

At the conclusion of the war all Southern sympathizers were to be pardoned, but the one in charge of Missouri said, "No". This area put out posters for Dick Kitchens, Anthony Wright, Bill Wilson and Jim Jamison.BILL went to Texas, Anthony to Louisiana, Jim was later pardoned and became a Texas Ranger.

After the war Dick was hiding in a cave east of Edgar Springs (where Highway H crosses Little Piney). Dick's mother's home was at the foot of the hill that leads to the Mitchell Cemetery. Sergeant Jim Samples and the Home Guard came looking for Dick. Dick's half-sister Bett, age 16, would slip out at night and take him food. Samples and his men caught her and tried to make her reveal where Dick was. She wouldn't, so they hung her from a walnut tree by the house. They shoved her mother into the house, chained the door, piled straw up to the front door and set it on fire. When they let Bett down, she said, "Now I didn't tell you, and I never will!" Then they hung her again. The second time, she was turning blue. By then Dick had gotten there with his guns shooting. The soldiers ran off. Bett had rope burns on her neck for many years. Dick said he could have killed them all, but he didn't want to kill anyone.

Another time Samples and his men came to Coon's (Dick's brother) home and took him up on a ridge to kill him if he didn't tell where Dick was. Coon thought the only thing that saved him was that John Samples, Jim's father, came. He was a Baptist preacher. He preached in a coat that had a bullet hole in the back. He walked stooped over. They asked him how he got that way. He said, "From dodging Bill Wilson's bullets." He had a crease on the back of his head from one.

Martha Ellen's mother was very sick. (She lived where Bud Arthur's farmis now located.) Dick went there to help sit up with her. Samples found out where he was and brought the Home Guard after dark. They fired two bullets into Mrs. Mace's pillow. Dick told his relatives to blow out the light and get on the floor. Dick saw the glint of a gun barrel and went out with both guns firing. He killed Samples and wounded some other. Dick escaped on his horse.

The soldiers went up to Uncle Antnie's (Dick's brother) at 2:00 in the morning to make him haul Samples's body home. He hauled the body with ateam of oxen and wagon. John Samples thanked him for bringing his boy home. Somebody asked Antnie if he didn't hate to haul him. He said, "Only thing I hate -- I didn't have a full load."

Dick was freighting and was at a blacksmith shop in Evening Shade, Arkansas. He had to shoe his horse. He took off his guns and hung them upon the bellows. He didn't have enough horseshoe nails and while getting them, someone shot him in the back with his own gun. He is buried at Evening Shade.

Martha's farm was where Roy Davidson's farm is located today. Martha later married Tom Kepler. She is buried in Renaud Cemetery.

Dicks's uncle, "Piney Bill" William Adams was kept awhile as a prisoner during the Civil War because authorities accused him of harboring bushwhackers in his home.

Submitted by Connie Davidson 
KITCHEN, George Patterson (I600)
 
133 Andrew Jackson (Dick) Kitchen was the son of George Kitchen and Elizabeth Adams. Dick (Bushwhacker book) married Martha Ellen Mace Edgar, March 31,1867, the daughter of Henry Mace and Elizabeth Black. Dick and Martha had a little girl who died after eating too many dried apples. She is buried at the Renaud Cemetery.

Oral family history says Dick and others fought the North as bushwhackers instead of putting on Southern uniforms. They destroyed government supply wagons at Beaver Creek, south of Rolla and around Edgar Springs and also gave food back to those people from whom the army had taken it.

At the conclusion of the war all Southern sympathizers were to be pardoned, but the one in charge of Missouri said, "No". This area put out posters for Dick Kitchens, Anthony Wright, Bill Wilson and Jim Jamison.BILL went to Texas, Anthony to Louisiana, Jim was later pardoned and became a Texas Ranger.

After the war Dick was hiding in a cave east of Edgar Springs (where Highway H crosses Little Piney). Dick's mother's home was at the foot of the hill that leads to the Mitchell Cemetery. Sergeant Jim Samples and the Home Guard came looking for Dick. Dick's half-sister Bett, age 16, would slip out at night and take him food. Samples and his men caught her and tried to make her reveal where Dick was. She wouldn't, so they hung her from a walnut tree by the house. They shoved her mother into the house, chained the door, piled straw up to the front door and set it on fire. When they let Bett down, she said, "Now I didn't tell you, and I never will!" Then they hung her again. The second time, she was turning blue. By then Dick had gotten there with his guns shooting. The soldiers ran off. Bett had rope burns on her neck for many years. Dick said he could have killed them all, but he didn't want to kill anyone.

Another time Samples and his men came to Coon's (Dick's brother) home and took him up on a ridge to kill him if he didn't tell where Dick was. Coon thought the only thing that saved him was that John Samples, Jim's father, came. He was a Baptist preacher. He preached in a coat that had a bullet hole in the back. He walked stooped over. They asked him how he got that way. He said, "From dodging Bill Wilson's bullets." He had a crease on the back of his head from one.

Martha Ellen's mother was very sick. (She lived where Bud Arthur's farmis now located.) Dick went there to help sit up with her. Samples found out where he was and brought the Home Guard after dark. They fired two bullets into Mrs. Mace's pillow. Dick told his relatives to blow out the light and get on the floor. Dick saw the glint of a gun barrel and went out with both guns firing. He killed Samples and wounded some other. Dick escaped on his horse.

The soldiers went up to Uncle Antnie's (Dick's brother) at 2:00 in the morning to make him haul Samples's body home. He hauled the body with ateam of oxen and wagon. John Samples thanked him for bringing his boy home. Somebody asked Antnie if he didn't hate to haul him. He said, "Only thing I hate -- I didn't have a full load."

Dick was freighting and was at a blacksmith shop in Evening Shade, Arkansas. He had to shoe his horse. He took off his guns and hung them upon the bellows. He didn't have enough horseshoe nails and while getting them, someone shot him in the back with his own gun. He is buried at Evening Shade.

Martha's farm was where Roy Davidson's farm is located today. Martha later married Tom Kepler. She is buried in Renaud Cemetery.

Dicks's uncle, "Piney Bill" William Adams was kept awhile as a prisoner during the Civil War because authorities accused him of harboring bushwhackers in his home.

Submitted by Connie Davidson 
KITCHENS, Andrew Jackson "Dick" (I680)
 
134 Andrew Jackson (Dick) Kitchen was the son of George Kitchen and Elizabeth Adams. Dick (Bushwhacker book) married Martha Ellen Mace Edgar, March 31,1867, the daughter of Henry Mace and Elizabeth Black. Dick and Martha had a little girl who died after eating too many dried apples. She is buried at the Renaud Cemetery.

Oral family history says Dick and others fought the North as bushwhackers instead of putting on Southern uniforms. They destroyed government supply wagons at Beaver Creek, south of Rolla and around Edgar Springs and also gave food back to those people from whom the army had taken it.

At the conclusion of the war all Southern sympathizers were to be pardoned, but the one in charge of Missouri said, "No". This area put out posters for Dick Kitchens, Anthony Wright, Bill Wilson and Jim Jamison.BILL went to Texas, Anthony to Louisiana, Jim was later pardoned and became a Texas Ranger.

After the war Dick was hiding in a cave east of Edgar Springs (where Highway H crosses Little Piney). Dick's mother's home was at the foot of the hill that leads to the Mitchell Cemetery. Sergeant Jim Samples and the Home Guard came looking for Dick. Dick's half-sister Bett, age 16, would slip out at night and take him food. Samples and his men caught her and tried to make her reveal where Dick was. She wouldn't, so they hung her from a walnut tree by the house. They shoved her mother into the house, chained the door, piled straw up to the front door and set it on fire. When they let Bett down, she said, "Now I didn't tell you, and I never will!" Then they hung her again. The second time, she was turning blue. By then Dick had gotten there with his guns shooting. The soldiers ran off. Bett had rope burns on her neck for many years. Dick said he could have killed them all, but he didn't want to kill anyone.

Another time Samples and his men came to Coon's (Dick's brother) home and took him up on a ridge to kill him if he didn't tell where Dick was. Coon thought the only thing that saved him was that John Samples, Jim's father, came. He was a Baptist preacher. He preached in a coat that had a bullet hole in the back. He walked stooped over. They asked him how he got that way. He said, "From dodging Bill Wilson's bullets." He had a crease on the back of his head from one.

Martha Ellen's mother was very sick. (She lived where Bud Arthur's farmis now located.) Dick went there to help sit up with her. Samples found out where he was and brought the Home Guard after dark. They fired two bullets into Mrs. Mace's pillow. Dick told his relatives to blow out the light and get on the floor. Dick saw the glint of a gun barrel and went out with both guns firing. He killed Samples and wounded some other. Dick escaped on his horse.

The soldiers went up to Uncle Antnie's (Dick's brother) at 2:00 in the morning to make him haul Samples's body home. He hauled the body with ateam of oxen and wagon. John Samples thanked him for bringing his boy home. Somebody asked Antnie if he didn't hate to haul him. He said, "Only thing I hate -- I didn't have a full load."

Dick was freighting and was at a blacksmith shop in Evening Shade, Arkansas. He had to shoe his horse. He took off his guns and hung them upon the bellows. He didn't have enough horseshoe nails and while getting them, someone shot him in the back with his own gun. He is buried at Evening Shade.

Martha's farm was where Roy Davidson's farm is located today. Martha later married Tom Kepler. She is buried in Renaud Cemetery.

Dicks's uncle, "Piney Bill" William Adams was kept awhile as a prisoner during the Civil War because authorities accused him of harboring bushwhackers in his home.

Submitted by Connie Davidson 
REYNERSON, Susan Elizabeth (I684)
 
135 Andrew Jackson (Dick) Kitchen was the son of George Kitchen and Elizabeth Adams. Dick (Bushwhacker book) married Martha Ellen Mace Edgar, March 31,1867, the daughter of Henry Mace and Elizabeth Black. Dick and Martha had a little girl who died after eating too many dried apples. She is buried at the Renaud Cemetery.

Oral family history says Dick and others fought the North as bushwhackers instead of putting on Southern uniforms. They destroyed government supply wagons at Beaver Creek, south of Rolla and around Edgar Springs and also gave food back to those people from whom the army had taken it.

At the conclusion of the war all Southern sympathizers were to be pardoned, but the one in charge of Missouri said, "No". This area put out posters for Dick Kitchens, Anthony Wright, Bill Wilson and Jim Jamison.BILL went to Texas, Anthony to Louisiana, Jim was later pardoned and became a Texas Ranger.

After the war Dick was hiding in a cave east of Edgar Springs (where Highway H crosses Little Piney). Dick's mother's home was at the foot of the hill that leads to the Mitchell Cemetery. Sergeant Jim Samples and the Home Guard came looking for Dick. Dick's half-sister Bett, age 16, would slip out at night and take him food. Samples and his men caught her and tried to make her reveal where Dick was. She wouldn't, so they hung her from a walnut tree by the house. They shoved her mother into the house, chained the door, piled straw up to the front door and set it on fire. When they let Bett down, she said, "Now I didn't tell you, and I never will!" Then they hung her again. The second time, she was turning blue. By then Dick had gotten there with his guns shooting. The soldiers ran off. Bett had rope burns on her neck for many years. Dick said he could have killed them all, but he didn't want to kill anyone.

Another time Samples and his men came to Coon's (Dick's brother) home and took him up on a ridge to kill him if he didn't tell where Dick was. Coon thought the only thing that saved him was that John Samples, Jim's father, came. He was a Baptist preacher. He preached in a coat that had a bullet hole in the back. He walked stooped over. They asked him how he got that way. He said, "From dodging Bill Wilson's bullets." He had a crease on the back of his head from one.

Martha Ellen's mother was very sick. (She lived where Bud Arthur's farmis now located.) Dick went there to help sit up with her. Samples found out where he was and brought the Home Guard after dark. They fired two bullets into Mrs. Mace's pillow. Dick told his relatives to blow out the light and get on the floor. Dick saw the glint of a gun barrel and went out with both guns firing. He killed Samples and wounded some other. Dick escaped on his horse.

The soldiers went up to Uncle Antnie's (Dick's brother) at 2:00 in the morning to make him haul Samples's body home. He hauled the body with ateam of oxen and wagon. John Samples thanked him for bringing his boy home. Somebody asked Antnie if he didn't hate to haul him. He said, "Only thing I hate -- I didn't have a full load."

Dick was freighting and was at a blacksmith shop in Evening Shade, Arkansas. He had to shoe his horse. He took off his guns and hung them upon the bellows. He didn't have enough horseshoe nails and while getting them, someone shot him in the back with his own gun. He is buried at Evening Shade.

Martha's farm was where Roy Davidson's farm is located today. Martha later married Tom Kepler. She is buried in Renaud Cemetery.

Dicks's uncle, "Piney Bill" William Adams was kept awhile as a prisoner during the Civil War because authorities accused him of harboring bushwhackers in his home.

Submitted by Connie Davidson 
MACE, Martha Ellen (I709)
 
136 Anthony and his son George located on Little Piney, and served on the first jury in the Crawford County Court. KITCHEN, William Anthony (I4168)
 
137 Anthony Kitchens Wright was a "Bushwacker" and sole surviving son of Judge Lewis Wright family. Anthony never took oath of allegiance after Civil War. Family tradition says "he was wanted by the law all of his life." 1869 St. Louis deed record shows where Anthony and John Jackson, Administer for Lewis F Wright estate, met and finalized the land transaction. John Jackson came back and recorded the same at Phelps County Court House.

Side note: coincidence that at this same time, Col. Babcoke's house in Miller County was set fire and destroyed. Babcoke's soon depart and no record yet found. [Babcoke was the one who murdered Anthony's father and four brothers.] 
WRIGHT, Anthony Kitchen (I4195)
 
138 Anthony paid taxes for the first time in Washington County, Kentucky in 1799. Since it was a Kentucky law that all males OVER the age of 21 must pay tax, this proves that Anthony's birth year would be 1778, not 1780 as previously estimated. KITCHEN, William Anthony (I4168)
 
139 Anthony was the first tailor to settle in the county, and the young swains
gave him considerable work in cutting blue jeans 
KITCHEN, William Anthony (I4168)
 
140 Appointed as overseer of the road from Browns Ferry to Henry Price's Sr. HEAVIN, Richard (I6056)
 
141 Army Sergeant, World War II SANDERS, Warren H. (I1396)
 
142 Arnold W. McKibben, 87, of Burlington died at 10:55 a.m. Thursday, April 16, 2009, at Great River Hospice House in West Burlington.

Born Sept. 19, 1921, in Burlington, he was the son of Lee and Martha Elizabeth Kobus McKibben. On Dec. 25, 1941, he married Norma Frances Lee in Burlington.

Mr. McKibben worked 43 years as a machine operator at Leopold Desk Co., retiring in 1982. He was a 1963 graduate of Burlington High School. He served in the Army during World War II with the 60th Signal Batallion 9th Army in the South Pacific. He was of the Protestant faith. He enjoyed watching college football and was a wrestling fan.

Survivors include his wife; two daughters, Sandra Kay Voigt of Alvin, Texas, and Jodonna Lee Cooley of the Kansas City area; one grandchild; two stepgrandchildren; four stepgreat-grandchildren; nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents, four sisters and three brothers.

Visitation will be from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday at Hass-Thielen Funeral Home in Burlington where family will receive friends from 2 to 4 p.m.

The funeral for Mr. McKibben will be at 10 a.m. Monday at the funeral home with the Rev. Randy Gearhart officiating. Burial with military rites will be in Burlington Memorial Park Cemetery in Burlington.

A memorial has been established for Great River Hospice House.
 
MCKIBBEN, Arnold Willis (I5574)
 
143 ARTHUR, Mrs. Barney [Emily C. (Earp) Arthur
March 26, 1891, Mrs. Barney Arthur, daughter of Mr. John Earp, of Little Piney, died at her home in Aurora March 17th. She was brought to this place and interred in the Renaud burying ground.
 
EARP, Emily Catherine (I892)
 
144 as a Private in the US Army in WWII PHELPS, Walter Christopher (I1918)
 

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